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Are you a workaholic?
Or your partner?

To which of these questions do you have to answer with often or almost always?

 

  1. You spend a lot more time on your work than your original plan.
  2. You work to fight feelings of guilt, fear, depression or helplessness. Be honest with yourself with this question! It’s a deep question that requires some soul searching.
  3. Others have told you to work less, without having listened to their advice.
  4. You get stressed when you can’t work.
  5. You give up your free time, physical exercise and family time because of your work.
  6. You think how to free up more time for work.
  7. You work so much that it negatively affects your health.

 

How many questions do you score with often or almost always? If it’s four or more, there is a good chance that you meet the qualification of a workaholic.

 

In this questionnaire, which was developed by the University of Bergen, you don’t count the number of hours that you work. Which is conventional wisdom to speak about workaholics for most people. Of course, there is a link between spending many hours at work and the chance of work addiction. But not always!

 

Part-time workaholic

Being a workaholic is much more about the feelings that we have about work. Someone who works part-time can be a workaholic. And someone who works 80 hours a week does not have to be a workaholic. I personally know some people who put in many hours each week, but who can easily stop thinking about their work. They are able to switch as soon as they stop working. They continue with their hobby, family or another activity after work. And I know part-timers who definitely qualify as workaholics.

 

Observer exercise

Have your partner or someone else who is close to you answer these seven questions about you .

 

Reflection exercise

Imagine you have only three months to live. If you look back on your life and on your work, what would you have done differently? Which priorities would you set? Are your priorities your own priorities?

Time versus money

Money can be collected and saved. And if you have some money, you can try to make more of it. But, the only thing you can do with time is to spend it as wisely as possible. You cannot put it in a box, and retrieve it later.

 

Hopefully this inspires.

 

Paul Donkers

 

During our executive coaching programs, reconnecting to a healthy work-life balance is often part of our program. We offer actionable tools for it. Want to know more? Please click here


By Paul Donkers

"my purpose is to help improve strategy execution, to create high performing teams and coach for effective business leaders"

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